We found lapis lazuli hidden in ancient teeth – revealing the forgotten role of women in medieval arts

For the medieval Christian, opening an illuminated religious text was like opening a window into the sacred. These lavishly decorated books contained teachings of the church and helped deepen the beliefs of the faithful. The luxurious materials used in their creation glittered in the light, offering an elevated spiritual experience. A brilliant blue pigment known as ultramarine, a color often associated with holiness and royalty in art, was reserved for special features of this artwork —

We found lapis lazuli hidden in ancient teeth – revealing the forgotten role of women in medieval arts

We recently and unexpectedly revealed direct archaeological evidence of involvement of medieval women in manuscript production, challenging widespread assumptions that male monks were the sole ...

Fri 11 Jan 19 from Phys.org

Blue Tooth Reveals Woman Scribe From Middle Ages

For the medieval Christian, opening an illuminated religious text was like opening a window into the sacred. These lavishly decorated books contained teachings of the church and helped deepen ...

Thu 10 Jan 19 from Discover Magazine

Medieval dental plaque suggests women played important role as scribes

A rare blue pigment found in a medieval woman's teeth adds to the idea that many scribes at the time were women

Wed 9 Jan 19 from Newscientist

Blue specks reveal a Medieval woman’s life

Tiny particles trapped in the teeth of a thousand-year-old skeleton throw new light on the role of women in the Middle Ages. Andrew Masterson reports.

Wed 9 Jan 19 from Cosmos Magazine

Blue tooth reveals unknown female artist from medieval times

Rare paint particles found in the teeth of a medieval nun indicate that she was an unknown illustrator of sacred texts.

Wed 9 Jan 19 from BBC News

Illuminating women's role in the creation of medieval manuscripts

During the European Middle Ages, literacy and written texts were largely the province of religious institutions. Richly illustrated manuscripts were created in monasteries for use by members ...

Wed 9 Jan 19 from Phys.org

What a Blue Speck Found in Ancient Teeth Could Reveal About Female Artists in the Middle Ages

Analysis of fossilized dental tartar of a medieval woman buried in a German monastery reveals specks of blue to be lapis lazuli — a luxurious pigment used to create gorgeous illuminated manuscripts.

Fri 11 Jan 19 from KQED Science

Blue teeth reveal medieval nun's artistic talent

Analysis identifies traces of the precious stone lapis lazuli

Fri 11 Jan 19 from Chemistry World

Mysterious blue pigment in medieval woman's teeth gives scientists 'bombshell' clue

Vivid flecks of blue discovered in the teeth of a 1,000-year-old skeleton from the medieval era have given scientists a rare glimpse into an ancient woman's past.

Thu 10 Jan 19 from FOXNews

These 1,000-year-old, blue-specked teeth could rewrite medieval history

Science Lapis lazuli was hard to get your hands—or mouth—on. A new study uses analysis of dental calculus to show the crucial role a woman played in medieval manuscript ...

Thu 10 Jan 19 from Popular Science

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